Film

Terrifying Movie Inc. receives $300K for feature film in Nova Scotia

‘Not as much as we would get from the old system,' producer said

The Nova Scotia film industry is getting a boost from the new Film and Television Incentive Fund.
The Nova Scotia film industry is getting a boost from the new Film and Television Incentive Fund.   Meech Kean

A Nova Scotia film is getting $300,000 from the new film and TV incentive fund.

Bill Niven, producer of Halloween Party, is happy to get the money.

“It’s always good to receive funding,” Niven said, “although it’s not quite enough, and it’s not as much as we would get from the old system.”

Last July the Nova Scotia government replaced the film industry tax credit with the Nova Scotia Film and Television Incentive Fund. The change saw the once 100 per cent tax credit that pays the labour costs for a film replaced by a 25 per cent deductible for the entire cost of a film.

The funding for Terrifying Movie Inc., announced Tuesday, is the largest investment for a feature film in Nova Scotia since September.

Niven says it means very little for the Nova Scotia film industry.

“This is a very small project,” he said. “It’s not going to put very many people to work. We will spend money, and we will attract some investment to the province, but we have to bring back the tax credit system.”

Niven began working as a producer in 1999 on the TV series Pirates and most recently worked as executive producer on the CBC mini-series The Book of Negroes, which aired last year.

A number of films and TV series have received funding through the new incentive fund, including the upcoming TV series Trailer Park Boys Out of the Park: Europe and the film The Child Remains.

A spokesperson for NSBI declined to comment on Tuesday’s funding announcement.

Last year the government said it had a number of priorities to consider including health-care, education or the film industry.